Therapeutic Poetry: Connecting with Words

Therapeutic Poetry: Connecting with Words

Poetry: often regarded as the domain of lofty, high-brows: difficult to understand, and even more difficult to write. In its traditional sense, it almost could be argued that poetry has lost its flare, its ability to connect. When I say traditional, I mean rhyming couplets, clear stanzas, sonnets, etc. Stuff dead people write. My response would be that that is absolute nonsense.

Poetry today is dominated by slam poetry. The outcries of the young and the broken, the abused. The neglected. Simply, those who want to be heard. Poets loudly project their stories, and through public events and the power of the internet, people everywhere can listen and appreciate. Now I mention slam poetry not because there is anything wrong with it, in fact one might say that it is the next step in the evolution of poetry.

It has become popular, and it is meant to be heard by many. Some people benefit much from it. But its purpose is to excite–it can be chaotic in its ferocity and passion.

I am not arguing for a step-back in poetic technique, but I do think that some of us could benefit from experimenting with closed form poetry–as a sort of therapeutic device. An almost zen-like state can be achieved through simple, closed poetry.

The Haiku

matsuo-bashoOnce again, I know what your probably thinking: in the first sentence you mentioned that poetry is “difficult to understand” and “difficult to write.” Poetry, in many forms is actually quite simple, at least in a basic sense. And what I am trying to push is not brilliant poetry for the masses, but private, calming poetry. Sort of like knitting or cross stitch. A mix of accomplishment as well as focus and harmony.

Consider this haiku by Matsuo Basho:

Spring going–

birds crying and tears

in the eyes of the fish

This poem comes from Basho’s The Narrow Road to the Deep North, in which he wrote based on his travels through Japan. It might be a tad intimating at first, considering that Basho is considered to be a master of the haiku, but the haiku is one of the most accessible forms of poetry.

A common technique is the first and last lines consist of five syllables, while the middle line consists of seven syllables. Anyone can do it. Many haikus have nature themes, but the syllables are variable. For example, Jack Kerouac wrote hundreds of “American haikus,” which rarely ever followed the rule. Take this one for instance:

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Glow worm

sleeping on this flower–

your light’s on.

Simplicity. That’s the emphasis in these poems. They allow you to simple process the world around you, and document your experience. Poems like this allow one to condense the complexities of life into a few short lines. And I mentioned before, it can be extremely calming.

The Sonnet

Moving towards more complex poetry, one might look at the sonnet–popularized by none other than William Shakespeare. Again, sounds intimidating, but it’s not. A few more rules are required than in a haiku, and it takes more time, but it can be quite a rewarding process.

There are two main types of sonnets: the Shakespearean, consisting of three, four line stanzas, followed by a couplet (two lines), and the Italian, which is broken into two parts, an octave (the first eight lines) and a sestet (the last six lines). Additionally, both types of sonnets follow specific rhyme schemes.

The Shakespearean: william-shakespeare-portrait11

a b a b

c d c d

e f e f

g g

The Italian:

a b b a a b b a

c d c d c d

Okay. Maybe it’s a tad more complicated than a haiku, but that’s besides the point. Once you get going, the sonnet can provide a frame for your life experience. A meticulous mosaic, simplifying the complicated and providing closer. Sometimes, the best thing for someone is a bit of restriction, some rules to provide organization for the chaos that can be life. The sonnet provides that. For example, here is Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 73”

That time of year thou may’st in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruin’d choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou see’st the twilight of such day,
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by-and-by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed whereon it must expire
Consum’d with that which it was nourish’d by.
   This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,
   To love that well which thou must leave ere long.

In Conclusion…

Poetry allows for people of all ages to connect with the world around them, and more tradition forms like the haiku and the sonnet allow them to do it simply and privately. It can be a modest form of expression and analysis, and can be done on a personal level.

Poetry can be found in all things. Anything and everything can be poetry if the effort is put in–if the author has purpose. I argue that poetry can be used as a tool to mend, helping one understand that facets of one’s own life and connect with the nuances of others. A means to serenity and awareness, realization and unity.

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